Workshop Tool Safety Guide

With the Phase 1 workshop complete and Phase 2 well on the way, we thought the following guide to using tools safety would be handy…     #workplacesafety

TOOLS AND HOW TO USE THEM

CIRCULAR SAW – portable cutting tool used to make boards too short.

BELT SANDER – An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

WIRE WHEEL – Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to utter a short curse.

DRILL PRESS – A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

MULTI GRIPS – Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

HACKSAW – One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle… It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VICE-GRIPS – Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH – Used almost entirely for igniting various flammable objects in your shop and creating a fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub froom which you want to remove a bearing race.

TABLE SAW – Large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity. Very effective for digit removal.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK – Used for lowering a vehicle to the ground after you have installed your new brake pads, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

BAND SAW – A large stationary power saw primarily used by most workshops to cut large pieces into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge. Also good for Digit Removal

TWO-TONNE ENGINE HOIST – Tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of all the stuff you forgot to disconnect.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER – Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER – Tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.

CROWBAR – A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a £0.50p part.

PVC PIPE CUTTER – A tool used to make plastic pipe too short.

HAMMER – Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE – Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door. Works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund cheques, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

AAAAARRGHHH TOOL – Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the workshop while yelling “Aaaaarrghhh” at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need.

Powering ahead with funding from Apache North Sea

The Banchory and District Men’s Shed has received a generous donation of £20,000 from Apache North Sea towards converting the open area of the Legion’s undercroft into a multi-purpose workshop and social area – what we refer to as “Phase 2”.

Banchory Legion Undercroft

Karen Williamson, Human Resources Manager, Apache North Sea, commented: “Apache has a strong focus on the health and wellbeing of its people and is delighted to be able to contribute to the local community in supporting the expansion of the Banchory Men’s Shed. This in turn will help to prevent isolation, improve wellbeing and bring people in the community together to a welcoming space, to share skills and most importantly, have fun”.

For the full Press Release, please click here (opens .pdf file)

Be Yourself in a Men’s Shed

The new healthy living magazine for the North-East of Scotland, called “Be You”, has included a great article in its Spring 2019 Launch Issue, on Men’s Sheds.  With background from the Scottish Men’s Sheds Association Exec. Officer, Jason Schroeder, the article covers what a Men’s Shed is, the genesis of the Men’s Sheds movement and its development in Scotland.

Whilst many of those already familiar don’t need any more convincing, it is good to see the Men’s Shed message get out to a wider audience, and this will hopefully yield more members, especially in Banchory as our Phase 1 build starts.

You can read the article in the attached file – click the picture on the right to download a .pdf file.

For your own magazine copy, look out for it in many locations, including Number One in Banchory, Doctors and Dentists surgeries, most cafes and restaurants, hairdressers and beauticians, and Deeside physio amongst others, and learn more about local facilities and businesses.

Many thanks to Be You magazine for permission to reproduce the article.

March 2019 Update

Many Things have been happening in the world of the Banchory Men’s Shed since we last updated the web site, rather a long time ago. And with confirmation of the main event now received, we can announce a number of matters.

Signing of the Lease

After much work and many months of “final” lease clarifications, the Banchory Men’s Shed is very pleased to announce that in January/February we finalised and signed our Lease with the Banchory Legion, to allow us to proceed with the next stages of creating our Men’s Shed. The signed Lease has now been acknowledged by and is back with the Solicitors for registration.

In achieving this milestone our Chairman, Paul, has managed to maintain an outward appearance of placid control and equanimity, much as a duck on a pond does, belying the reality that below the water the feet have been furiously paddling away, mainly between one set of solicitors and another. Our thanks are due to Paul, to staff at the Legion, and to everyone involved in making this happen over the last couple of years

Our next move is to re-engage with builders and get the building work under way for the “Phase 1” (Workshop) section. We will update you in due course as to how this is progressing and when we have a start date.

Workshop Equipment

With an excellent sense of timing, we are also grateful to one of our members who is downsizing, who has offered to donate his home workshop facilities to the Shed for installing in the Phase 1 Workshop room. This is gratefully acknowledged and we are currently working out temporary storage arrangements between his imminent house move and the Phase 1 room being ready.

Phase 2 Fund raising

Further funds have been received for our Phase 2 (Social Area) plans. In January, Shell UK awarded a sum of £1000 which we are allocating against the Phase 2 funding target, thus reaching £15,500 out of £57,000. A number of other grant sources remain open for applications and we will be able to update in due course.

Guest Speaker – 12th March

Chris Third of the Scottish Health Council will be coming to our social meeting on Tuesday to speak about ways in which you can become involved with improving local health services.  Please bring your partners and friends if they are interested.

The aim of the Scottish Health Council is to improve how the NHS listens to you, how it values peoples’ views and experience, how it respects us all as individuals, and how it involves you in the planning and delivery of health and care services. This is an interesting opportunity to find out how things work.

The talk will be part of our regular Tuesday social meeting, at 10:30 a.m., Tuesday 12th March at the Legion Banchory in Ramsay Road. We look forward to seeign you there.

Vote for us in the Aviva Community Fund

20th NOVEMBER UPDATE

We received 1138 votes 🙂 🙂

Voting has now ended, 11 a.m. 20th November 2018

Many thanks for all your votes.  From here you can see that as we have applied for between £1,000 and £5,000 we do not go forward to the Finals judging round,  If we are among the top 400 projects UK-wide in terms of votes, we will get the funding.

Original post:

Banchory Men’s Shed fundraising continues.

One of the sources we have looked at is the AVIVA Community Fund and after our initial application we have been shortlisted for an award 🙂 .  But like the Tesco Bags of Help campaign, we will only get actual funds if you, the public, support our application.  We therefore need a sufficient number of your votes, AVIVA’s on-line equivalent of Tesco’s blue tokens.  Admittedly not as tactile, but with a similar result  😉

You [could] vote by going to the AVIVA Community Fund site (or click the picture)

 

Davie Thomson

The Banchory Men’s Shed was saddened to say a final goodbye to Davie Thomson last Thursday at Baldarroch Crematorium; we were also very honoured to have been included in the beneficiaries of the retiring collection, along with Ward 114 at ARI.  A big thank you to David and Irene, their whole family, and mourners.

David passed away at the age of 69 on September 11th, after a long battle with oesophageal cancer.

He was a founder member of the Banchory Men’s Shed.  He gave his time and energy unstintingly to the Shed and to the wider community. Dave was one of life’s do-ers, always the first to volunteer and an asset to any club or organisation. His attitude and example will serve as a lesson to all of us, to get involved and make things happen. His energy, resolve and compassion were outstanding.

He will be sorely missed.
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New Research on Men’s Sheds

Not a huge surprise to us, but Men’s Sheds are proven to improve men’s health.

New research has been carried out by Manchester Metropolitan University on behalf of Age UK, and reported by the esteemed web site The Conversation.

The article, and the research, is mainly about retired men, so whilst entirely appropriate, we would remind people that Men’s Sheds are not only for the retired.

It’s an interesting read, so if you want to read further, the Conversation article is here and the Original research can be found here

Beat the Scammers

Apart from thinking (regularly!) about BMS funding, premises and leases, and taking the occasional bike ride, we are also starting to think about future activities that the Banchory Men’s Shed can offer, and one that has come up a number of times is to run classes to help people with IT and Computer / Tablet  / Smartphone use – both BMS members and the wider Banchory community. But we needn’t wait for such classes in order to help you avoid being scammed out of your money.  Please read on…

You may have seen in the P&J yesterday an article about a Deeside Postie and his mother who were scammed out of £80,000.  This is devastating for them and we hope they get somewhere with recovering the money.  But are you thinking “It couldn’t happen to me”?  Well, before you think that, read this article from the Telegraph some years back.  Any of that sound familiar to you?  Are you sure you would spot the problem?  And what if the line the scammers are spouting happens to coincide with something that has actually happened to you recently – like an actual card loss or a previous problem with your bank – and they therefore catch you with your guard already half down?  You could be taken in.

But, you say, surely your bank will protect you against such losses?  No, often not, especially if you have allowed yourself to give out legitimate transaction details to a scammer.

So, what to do and what not to do?

Prepare – do your homework

Each bank web site will have its own security advice – go and read it and take note.

Some of the information the banks present can however be quite complex and even tiresome to wade through.  We suggest you read the excellent Little Book of Big Scams (downloads .pdf document) published by a number of Police Forces.  This is a nice concise summary of pretty much everything the scammer can get up to, and the ways they can fool you.  It covers not only banking fraud but also computer “servicing” fraud, courier and door-to-door fraud and so forth.  Print it in booklet form, if your printer can do this, and keep it handy.

Also print out some basic rules and keep them next to your phone – either write them out yourself as you will remember best that way, or the RBS Phone Scam Sheet is one ready-made example.

And if the phone rings…

Stay Mindful

Remember – you are in control – there is nothing they can do if you keep your details to yourself.

If they use your correct name, it is no guarantee they are legitimate, but it can start to get beneath your defences.

They will try and get you “on edge” and not thinking straight by saying that you have possibly already suffered a loss.  That is almost certainly not the case, but even if it were, now is the time to say that you will call the bank’s fraud line back to check.  Simply hang up. Wait a while, find your equilibrium, get the bank’s number from a legitimate source and call them preferably from another phone (a mobile, or a neighbour’s).  The fraudsters could still be on the line to your own phone even though you might dial a correct number, simply by them not hanging up in the first place – that’s how the UK phone system works.

And finally

We’ve only covered the one sort of scam here – but do read the Little Book of Scams and stay on your guard.  And if you know someone who perhaps doesn’t have good internet access or might somehow be vulnerable, perhaps print them a copy, too.

 

BMS “in the box” for Tesco Bags of Help

Update – Banchory Men’s Shed entry into the Bags of Help scheme has now ended (30th June 2018)

The Banchory Men’s Shed are currently enjoying “pole position” (that is, the box nearest the door) for the current round of the Tesco Bags of Help scheme.

From their web site:

“Bags of Help is Tesco’s exciting local community grant scheme where the money raised by the sale of carrier bags is being used to fund thousands of local projects in communities right across the UK.”

When you check out at Tesco don’t forget to see if you qualify for carrier bag tokens and if you want to support the Banchory Men’s Shed’s fundraising drive, please drop them in our compartment of the transparent boxes to the right of the out door.

Lynn from Tesco drops in at Tuesday’s BMS social to meet some of the Banchory Shedders

Our participation as a nominated Charity for this round of Bags of Help runs from 1st May to 30th June and we would love it if you would drop your blue tokens in our box.  Depending on the level of support we should receive between £1000 and £4000 to put towards our fund raising efforts – we are intending to allocate these funds to Phase 2 of the premises.

Thanks, and keep those tokens coming !